follow us:

Latest News

Get ready to attack or defend in Rainbow Six: Siege
If you're tired of games with big maps, then Rainbow Six: Siege has what you need with battles that are up close and personal. ... [read more]
Halo 5 launches on October 27
Two trailers came out today revealing the release date of Halo 5 Guardian and giving two perspectives of the story. ... [read more]
Nintendo delays new Zelda game
If you were excited about the new Zelda game for the Wii U, well unfortunately you'll have to wait a little longer to play it.... [read more]

Latest Articles

Evolve, day 1 DLC, and the entitlement of gamers
Evolve hasn’t been out for 72 hours yet and gamers have already decided to make it public enemy number 1. This is thanks to the umbrella claim of “2K charging full price for an incomplete game, as well as for DLC that should have been included with the original purchase.... [read more]
PAX South Tour Guide Pt. 3 - Quick Tips
So far we’ve told you what to do in San Antonio as well as where to eat and drink while at PAX South. Now we have a few quick tips for those traveling to our great city. ... [read more]
The OG Replay for Jan. 19
We're less than a week from PAX South and everyone here is excited. Not only is one of the biggest gaming events coming to our home city of San Antonio, but we're going to have our own panel. ... [read more]

Latest Reviews

Sunset Overdrive Review: Grab an energy drink and grind some rails.
Insomniac Games heads to the Xbox One with their exclusive title, Sunset Overdrive.... [read more]
Dragon Age: Inquisition Review
Every time I tried to play either Dragon Age Origins or Dragon Age 2, I’d find myself playing for the first 10 or so hours before turning it off and playing a different game. I gave it one more chance with Dragon Age: Inquisition.... [read more]
Driveclub Review
Originally announced at the PS4 reveal event in Feb. 2013, Driveclub was due for release as a PS4 launch title. Development misfortunes led to an 11 month delay and the game was finally released in the first week of Oct. 2014. The game faced major challenges at launch as the... [read more]

Latest Videos

PAX South 2015: 8-Bit Eric does a Starr Mazer interview...kind of
On display at PAX South was a game called Starr Mazer, which mashes shmup gameplay with point-and-click adventure gameplay. 8-Bit Eric tried to do an interview with the developer, and well, you'll have to see what happens. ... [read more]
8-Bit Eric: Shiny the Firefly Review
8-Bit Eric takes a look at Shiny the Firefly on the Wii U. An indie game developed by Padaone games where you control a firefly on a rescue mission to protect its babies.... [read more]
8-Bit Eric: Ping 1.5+ Review
8-Bit Eric takes a look at the Wii U puzzle game Ping 1.5+ from Nami Tentou Mushi for the Wii U. ... [read more]
Dishonored Review
Posted on October 30, 2012 by Oscar Gonzalez

After Dishonored was announced, I wasn't especially excited for it.  The game had a Steampunk look to it and featured some interesting action elements to it, but it looked like an all style with no substance game that was made for those with a hard-on for Steampunk.  That all changed after I played a demo for the game at E3 in June.  I went from being a cynic to being a fan. 

'TIS AN HONOR

Even More Choices - When you bring up games that have a lot of freedom, titles like Elder Scrolls, Deus Ex, and GTA regularly come up.  In these games, you can handle a mission in a multitude of ways, and Dishonored is right up there with those iconic games.  Available to you in the game is a range of choices to complete the various objectives you're given.  There's the tried and true method of using brute force or keeping to the shadows to avoid detection.  Then there's the "tech" option available where you can deactivate panels to avoid guards setting off alarms or rewire various electric security devices so that they can be used against your enemies.  Your weapons and tools can also be upgraded with the gold you earn throughout the missions, and there are Bone Charms that can be found to make improvements to your attacks, movements and abilities.

It doesn't stop there, because you also have supernatural powers that really open up the possibilities.  Powers become available early on, and you can increase the number of spells or their effectiveness via runes that you collect during different missions.  Rather than sneaking around corners to avoid detection, you can use your powers to possess an enemy to get where you need to go, or teleport from point to point instead of staying in the shadows.  Rarely are you limited in a specific action in the game, leaving it up to you on how you want to tackle your objectives.

Choices Do Matter - Moral choices in games are nothing new.  Being the nice guy or being a dick are usually the extent of the choices available.  Sometimes the choices you make only result in some minor differences in dialogue and one of two endings.  Where Dishonored is different is how extensive the changes are from the actions you take.  After every mission, you're given a Chaos rating that will increase depending on how many people you kill, enemies and innocents.  Halfway in the game is where you see the effects of your choices take shape.  Certain people have a change of attitude that will vary on how you've been doing.  One person in particular changed drastically because of how I played the game, and what they did made me feel the effects of my previous choices.  I immediately felt remorse over how I had played, wishing wish I could have changed the past.  To me, that's the sign of a development team that was tired of cookie cutter moral choices in games that didn't have a substantial impact on the player.

Creepy as Hell - The entire presentation for Dishonored is depressing, which is not a bad thing.  From the rats all over the place to the trash on the streets, I was getting skeeved out walking around the city of Dunwall.  It's a real testament to Arkane Studios for creating a city that had such exceptional detail yet was utterly disgusting to look at in some areas.  Although I didn't care much for the look of the character models, it was still a pleasure to see characters that had an artistic look rather than the photorealism that other games strive for and often fail at. 

The Story Comes Around - The plot for Dishonored is not that much different than various novels or movies placed in a whole new world.  Arkane Studios calls it "whale oil punk" as whale oil is the source of power for the city in the same fashion as steam or aether is the power source for Steampunk worlds.  As Corvo Attano, you were once a bodyguard of the Empress until she is murdered.  After being framed for the murder, you're saved from prison with a mission to find out who is responsible for killing the Empress.  Again, nothing really special for a story, and it stays fairly stale for the first half of the game.  Like I mentioned earlier, however, the second half is where the story kicks into gear, and the results of your actions make for a more compelling narrative.  It got to a point where I just had to see what happened next.  Playing the game in a different style meant for different interactions between certain characters, so I immediately wanted to jump back in.  Unfortunately, when making a game with a lot of freedom, the narrative often gets lost in the shuffle for the sake of choice, but that does not happen with Dishonored.


A DISHONORABLE RESULT

Wish It Was Bigger - Once you become familiar with all of Corvo's powers and the physics of the game, traversing through the missions can be either very slow and steady, if you play stealthy or quick and exciting as you dash through the streets of Dunwall.  You also come to realize that the missions feel very confined.  When you're on a mission, you can only explore that area of Dunwall.  Granted there are many nooks and cracks to find Runes, Bone Charms and other collectibles in, but I think having the different areas you visit in the missions connect with one another would have made Dishonored feel even more like a magical world.

I'm Not Mario Damn It - Something that started annoying me after awhile was how landing on a person is considered an attack.  I know that can be considered realistic since one man jumping on another man's head can be devastating, but nothing was more annoying then mistiming a jump as you follow a NPC landing a little too close to them counting as an attack.  Then that NPC would immediately begin to attack you forcing you to kill them.  It would have been much more ideal for a standard jump attack or pounce attack being available rather than having everyone in Dishonored acting like a Koopa with me being Mario. 





 

At E3 this year, I gave Dishonored the "Best of Show" award for a demo that completely floored me.  Although it was only one mission, I could tell that the potential for greatness was there.  After playing the game, I’m glad to see my hunch was right.  Dishonored offers not only greater choice, but greater consequences for your decisions, great atmosphere, and a compelling story that sucked me in.  There are some minor gripes, sure, but overall, Arkane Studios has made a great game.  Dishonored offers a truly unique video game experience and simply must be played.

*This review was based on the Xbox 360 version of the game with a review copy provided by the publisher.*

Oscar Gonzalez - Editor-in-Chief og (@) original-gamer.com | all author's articles

What's your most anticipated game for April?

Xenoblade Chronicles 3D
Mortal Kombat X
State of Decay: Year One Survival Edition
Dark Souls II: Scholar of the First Sin
View Results - View Comments

Podcast


Time to start 2015


Dishonored Review

Dishonored Review

Watch as The Knife of Dunwall puts into motion the events of Dishonored in a new gameplay trailer.

Other Gaming News From The Web